Tag Archives: Richard Haass

Some Of What Could Be

In one of his books the late Lee Iacocca stated that the American voters should demand that presidential candidates disclose who would be in their Cabinet if elected. Iacocca may have had some talent at selling Mustangs – more likely he was in the right place at the right time – but he was totally naïve (I’m being kind in my choice of words) when it came to being a major party presidential candidate. Major party candidates cannot disclose who would serve in their Cabinet and on their senior staff for a multitude of reasons; but op-ed writers can put out wish lists based on real world considerations. Let’s explore.     Continue reading Some Of What Could Be

Passages

The convergence of the pandemic and “Phase II” of my retirement has provided an increased opportunity to do more reading than I had planned on. (The main objectives of “Phase II” were to allow me to do more reading and writing. I’ve done a much better job on the additional reading.) I want to share four brief passages and an abbreviated version of their applicability to today. Let’s explore.   Continue reading Passages

SPECIAL NOTICE – RECOMMENDED READING ADDITION

I just added The World: A Brief Introduction by Richard Haass to the Recommended Reading List.  Dr. Haass is the President of The Council on Foreign Relations.  He is a conservative Republican so you might think it odd that he makes the Recommended Reading list on this site.  Well, it is for the second time and that is because he bases everything on the truth along with his vast foreign relations and governmental experience.

The book is a surprisingly brief and yet comprehensive overview of relevant factors effecting the global community.

Last Minute Gift? Give Knowledge

When I talk to young people I tell them if by the time they are forty years old when they look in the mirror if they don’t see their best teacher they did something wrong. I’m not going to sell math short and I agree with the emphasis put on STEM but reading is far and away the most important academic skill. Basically, if you can read you can teach yourself almost anything. Continue reading Last Minute Gift? Give Knowledge