Tag Archives: money in politics

Tell A Bigger Lie

It’s late September, your Party gained control of both the executive and legislative branches of government and you have yet to pass a piece of significant legislation. What do you do? The answer Republicans came up with last week is to tell an even bigger lie. It’s a little more complex so let’s explore. Continue reading Tell A Bigger Lie

In The Long Run Nothing Will Change

This is a cutting through the malarkey and airing a decades old pet peeve article. It was recently brought into the news by virtue of a major hack at the consumer credit reporting bureau Equifax. Along with their two major competitors Trans Union and Experian they have been giving the American consumer a raw deal for at least my entire adult life. Let’s explore. Continue reading In The Long Run Nothing Will Change

Should We Say 12 Days?

Recently I complimented the decision and Congress’ action to package three must pass issues into a single bill and pass it. Theoretically that left the rest of September to act on things like renewing the flood insurance program and CHIPs. In the interim an initial aid package for Hurricane Irma relief became a front burner issue. President Trump dumped the DACA mess back into Congress’ lap. The talk you commonly hear is that they have six months to act when in reality Trump’s action starts negatively impacting real people’s lives in October. That is still a lot on the table without ever even considering tax reform or an infrastructure package. Let’s explore how Congress is scheduled to handle this slate. Continue reading Should We Say 12 Days?

Work Ahead?

Congress is getting back in town today after another long vacation. It seems as time goes on each Congress is less productive than its predecessor. The cynical (sometimes including me) often wonder if they are actually capable of productivity. We will discover the answer to that this month. Let’s explore. Continue reading Work Ahead?

Labor Getting Trumped

Today is Labor Day. It is a very special day for pro-union progressives like me. I am retired (except for my writing which to date I have never accepted monetary compensation for) and know what it is like to work for a paycheck. What that paycheck represented to me was disposable income with which I financed my lifestyle. Two factors: earnings and taxes determined what my net pay was. One of President Trump’s big agenda items is what he calls tax reform. Let’s explore what that really means to Joe Lunchbucket.   Continue reading Labor Getting Trumped